January 27, 2022

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Lithuania Travel Advisory

14 min read

Reconsider travel to Lithuania due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Lithuania due to COVID-19.

Lithuania has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Lithuania. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Lithuania.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Lithuania:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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