January 27, 2022

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Libya Independence Day

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Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States and the American People, I extend best wishes for a joyous Independence Day to Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj and to the Libyan people.

This year has been an important one for Libya with the announcement of a nationwide ceasefire on October 23 and progress on a Libyan-owned and Libyan-led political process, facilitated by the United Nations.  Of particular importance is the decision to hold national elections on Independence Day in 2021.  In the year ahead, we will support Libyans in building on these successes, including through full implementation of the ceasefire agreement and maintaining the remarkable momentum of the political process.  The United States is focused on promoting a peaceful, prosperous, and unified Libya with an inclusive government that can both secure the country and meet the economic and humanitarian needs of its people.

The United States wishes all Libyans a very happy Independence Day.

 

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