January 24, 2022

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Liberia Travel Advisory

17 min read

Reconsider travel to Liberia due to COVID-19.  

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Liberia due to COVID-19.   

Liberia has resumed airport operations and re-opened its borders. Business operations have also resumed, as have schools for grades six through twelve. Other improved conditions have been reported within Liberia. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Liberia. 

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Urban areas and public beaches due to crime.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Liberia:

Urban Areas and Public Beaches

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, is common. Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crimes.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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