January 25, 2022

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Las Vegas Man Sentenced to Prison for Fraudulent Tax Return Scheme

13 min read
<div>A Las Vegas, Nevada, man was sentenced to 70 months in prison for conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman, U.S. Attorney Nicholas A. Trutanich for the District of Nevada, and Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation Special Agent in Charge Tara Sullivan.</div>

A Las Vegas, Nevada, man was sentenced to 70 months in prison for conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman, U.S. Attorney Nicholas A. Trutanich for the District of Nevada, and Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation Special Agent in Charge Tara Sullivan.

On Aug. 22, 2018, a federal jury in Las Vegas found Terry Williamson guilty of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1349.

The evidence at trial proved that Williamson played a leading role in a mail and wire fraud conspiracy from January 2009 through April 2011. As part of the scheme, Williamson’s co-conspirators filed false tax returns with the IRS to fraudulently obtain tax refunds. They used the names and social security numbers of deceased taxpayers in order to facilitate the fraud.

To handle the fraudulently obtained refund checks, Williamson opened a bank account using the business name Refund and Rebates Management Inc. (Refund and Rebates). After Williamson or his compatriots deposited the refund checks into the Refund and Rebates bank account, Williamson transferred large amounts of cash to his personal account and to the accounts of his co-conspirators, and used the remaining funds in the account for his own personal enrichment, including a $60,000 fully loaded pick-up truck. More than 480 fraudulent tax refund checks totaling almost $2 million were deposited into Williamson’s account.

In addition to the term of imprisonment imposed, U.S. District Judge Miranda Du ordered Williamson to serve one year of supervised release.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman and U.S. Attorney Trutanich commended special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation, who investigated the case, and Trial Attorney Sarah Kiewlicz of the Tax Division and AUSA John Mulcahy (former Tax Division Trial Attorney), who prosecuted the case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the division’s website.

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