January 27, 2022

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Laos Travel Advisory

13 min read

Reconsider travel to Laos due to COVID-19. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

Laos has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within Laos.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Laos.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Xaisomboun Province due to civil unrest.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Remote areas along the border with Burma due to crime.
  • Areas of Savannakhet, Xieng Khouang, Saravane, Khammouane, Sekong, Champassak, Houaphan, Attapeu, Luang Prabang, and Vientiane provinces, as well as along Route 7 (from Route 13 to the Vietnam border), Route 9 (Savannakhet to the Vietnam border), and Route 20 (Pakse to Saravane) due to unexploded bombs.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Laos:

Xaisomboun Province

There is a continued threat of violence in Xaisomboun Province. 

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Xiasomboun Province as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel there.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas on the Border with Burma

Bandits, drug traffickers, and other people pursuing illegal activities operate in these areas, as do armed groups opposed to the Burmese government.

Areas of Savannakhet, Xieng Khouang, Saravane, Khammouane, Sekong, Champassak, Houaphan, Attapeu, Luang Prabang, and Vientiane provinces, as well as along Route 7

There are large numbers of unexploded bombs in these areas left over from the Indochina War.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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