December 9, 2021

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Lao People’s Democratic Republic National Day

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Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States and the American people, I extend best wishes on the occasion of the 45th anniversary of the founding of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

This is a notable year as our two nations also celebrate 65 years of diplomatic relations, and as we prepare to commemorate the 5th anniversary of our Comprehensive Partnership. Our relationship is built on mutual respect, ASEAN centrality, and a shared commitment to Lao sovereignty. Our bilateral cooperation is built on a solid foundation of people-to-people ties, and our Comprehensive Partnership reflects broad engagement between our two governments on health, development, law enforcement, and trade.

We join the people of Laos in marking the importance of this anniversary and in honoring 65 years of increased understanding and cooperation between our countries. We look forward to our work together to deepen our ties and to build a peaceful and prosperous future.

 

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