January 20, 2022

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Kuwait Travel Advisory

9 min read

Reconsider travel to Kuwait due to COVID-19. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Kuwait due to COVID-19.  

Kuwait has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations) and business operations (including schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Kuwait. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Kuwait.

Do not travel to:

  • The desert region near the border with Iraq due to the prevalence of unexploded ordnance.

Exercise increased caution:

  • The Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh area in Kuwait City due to crime.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Kuwait, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Kuwait:

Desert Region North of the Mutla’a Ridge and Near the Border with Iraq – Do Not Travel

Desert areas and certain beaches north of the Mutla’a Ridge continue to contain unexploded ordnance left over from the 1990-1991 Gulf War. Travelers should avoid areas that are “off the beaten path” and avoid touching objects that are potentially unexploded ordnance.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh – Exercise Increased Caution

The Kuwaiti Ministry of Interior has identified the neighborhood of Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh on the outskirts of Kuwait International Airport as a high-crime area.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to information on crime.

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