January 24, 2022

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Kevin M. Epstein Appointed as U.S. Trustee for the Southern and Western Districts of Texas

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<div>Attorney General William P. Barr has appointed Kevin M. Epstein as the U.S. Trustee for the Southern and Western Districts of Texas (Region 7) effective Jan. 1, 2021, the Executive Office for U.S. Trustees (EOUST) announced today.</div>

Attorney General William P. Barr has appointed Kevin M. Epstein as the U.S. Trustee for the Southern and Western Districts of Texas (Region 7) effective Jan. 1, 2021, the Executive Office for U.S. Trustees (EOUST) announced today.  He will replace Henry G. Hobbs Jr., who is retiring after 28 years of government service. 

Mr. Epstein has been a Trial Attorney with the U.S. Trustee Program for 21 years, first in San Jose, California, and since 2003 in San Antonio, Texas.  During his tenure, he also has served as an Acting Assistant U.S. Trustee in charge of three different field offices.  Mr. Epstein received his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law and his undergraduate degree from Duke University, both with honors.

“We are pleased to have Mr. Epstein join our leadership team,” said EOUST Director Cliff White.  “His depth of legal experience and practical approach to management, along with his strong commitment to mission, will serve Region 7 well.  I also want to extend my best wishes and deepest appreciation to Mr. Hobbs for his many significant contributions to the U.S. Trustee Program over the years.”

The U.S. Trustee Program is the component of the Justice Department that protects the integrity of the bankruptcy system by overseeing case administration and litigating to enforce the bankruptcy laws.  The USTP has 21 regions and 90 field office locations.  Region 7 has offices in Austin, Corpus Christi, Houston, and San Antonio, Texas.

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