January 25, 2022

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Justice Department Launches Investigation of the Mount Vernon Police Department

7 min read
<div>Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke for the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and U.S. Attorney Damian Williams for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) announced today that the Justice Department has opened a pattern or practice investigation into the Mount Vernon Police Department (MVPD).</div>
Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke for the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and U.S. Attorney Damian Williams for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) announced today that the Justice Department has opened a pattern or practice investigation into the Mount Vernon Police Department (MVPD).

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