December 4, 2021

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Justice Department Files Complaint Against Professional Compounding Centers of America Inc. for Reporting Fraudulent Pricing Information for Ingredients Sold to Pharmacies

8 min read
<div>The Justice Department has filed a complaint under the False Claims Act against Professional Compounding Centers of America Inc. (PCCA), a Houston-based company that sells active pharmaceutical ingredients and other products and services to compounding pharmacies.</div>
The Justice Department has filed a complaint under the False Claims Act against Professional Compounding Centers of America Inc. (PCCA), a Houston-based company that sells active pharmaceutical ingredients and other products and services to compounding pharmacies.

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