December 9, 2021

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Justice Department Awards Nearly $104 Million to Help Crime Victims in Indian Country

6 min read
<div>The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), a component of the Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP), has awarded nearly $104 million to serve victims in tribal communities, of which nearly $101 million was awarded through the Crime Victims Fund Tribal Victim Services Set-Aside.</div>
The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), a component of the Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP), has awarded nearly $104 million to serve victims in tribal communities, of which nearly $101 million was awarded through the Crime Victims Fund Tribal Victim Services Set-Aside.

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    In U.S GAO News
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