December 4, 2021

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Justice Department Announces Expansion of Firearms Technical Assistance Project to Strengthen Community Response to Domestic Violence Incidents Involving Firearms

15 min read
<div>Today, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) announced the expansion of its Firearms Technical Assistance Project (FTAP) to help communities across the country reduce domestic violence homicides and injuries committed with firearms. OVW will award an estimated $6 million for up to 12 sites and $4 million for training and technical assistance on firearms and domestic violence.</div>
Today, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) announced the expansion of its Firearms Technical Assistance Project (FTAP) to help communities across the country reduce domestic violence homicides and injuries committed with firearms. OVW will award an estimated $6 million for up to 12 sites and $4 million for training and technical assistance on firearms and domestic violence.

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