January 27, 2022

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Jordan Travel Advisory

12 min read

Reconsider travel to Jordan due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Jordan due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Jordan due to COVID-19.

Jordan has lifted stay at home orders and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Jordan.

Do not travel to:

Terrorist groups continue to plot possible attacks in Jordan. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.  

Read the country information page

If you decide to travel to Jordan:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.  
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Avoid demonstrations and protests.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Jordan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

The Border with Syria and Iraq

Travelers should avoid Jordan’s border with Syria and Iraq given the continued threat of cross-border violence, including the risk of terrorist attacks. All U.S. government personnel on official travel must receive prior permission to visit any area within 10 km of the Jordan-Syria border, except the tourist site of Umm Qais or the city of Irbid. U.S. government personnel must also have permission for official travel on Highway 10 east of the town of Ruwayshid toward the Iraq border, or for official visits to refugee camps anywhere in Jordan. Personal travel by U.S. government employees to the border areas or refugee camps is not permitted. 

Protests

Both planned and impromptu protests may occur throughout Jordan. Avoid demonstrations and follow the guidance of local authorities.

Visit our website for High-Risk Travelers.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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