January 27, 2022

News

News Network

Joint Statement on the U.S.-Egypt Strategic Dialogue

21 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The text of the following statement was released by the Governments of the United States of America and the Arab Republic of Egypt on the occasion of the U.S.-Egypt Strategic Dialogue.

Begin Text:

Secretary of State Anthony J. Blinken and Minister of Foreign Affairs Sameh Shoukry led the U.S.-Egypt Strategic Dialogue on November 8-9, 2021, in Washington, D.C. The two sides noted the coming centennial of U.S.-Egypt diplomatic relations in 2022 and reaffirmed the importance of the U.S.-Egypt strategic partnership and identified areas in which to deepen bilateral and regional cooperation, including economic and commercial affairs, education, cultural issues, consular affairs, human rights, justice and law enforcement, and defense and security. They also agreed on the importance of holding this dialogue on a regular basis.

The United States and Egypt reaffirmed their steadfast commitment to the national security of both countries and to the stability of the Middle East. Egypt commended the U.S. role in economic development in Egypt and its supply of defense equipment, and joint cooperation to reinforce Egypt’s defense capabilities. The United States expressed its appreciation for Egypt’s leadership in mediating solutions to regional conflicts, notably in promoting peace and ending violence in Gaza.  Regarding the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), the United States reiterated President Biden’s support for Egypt’s water security. The United States and Egypt called for the resumption of negotiations over an agreement on the GERD under the auspices of the Chairperson of the African Union, in line with the Presidential Statement of the United Nations Security Council of September 15, 2021, and the 2015 Agreement on Declaration of Principles. The United States and Egypt stressed the importance of holding elections in Libya on December 24, and backed the action plan of the Libyan Joint Military Commission for the removal of all foreign forces, fighters, and mercenaries. U.S. and Egyptian counterparts also discussed Sudan and resolving regional conflicts and humanitarian crises in Syria, Lebanon, and Yemen, and agreed to continue high-level consultations on Middle East and African issues.

The two sides held a constructive dialogue on human rights and fundamental freedoms, including civil and political rights, freedom of expression, fighting racism, women’s empowerment, and economic, social, and cultural rights. The dialogue also covered human rights in multilateral fora.  Egypt welcomed the election of the United States to the UN Human Rights Council. The United States welcomed Egypt’s National Human Rights Strategy, and national plans to advance human rights in the country in cooperation with civil society. The two sides agreed to continue dialogue on human rights.

The two delegations reaffirmed their shared commitment to broaden and deepen bilateral economic and commercial cooperation, and to cooperate closely on climate issues. They shared ideas on increasing investment in their respective economies, providing more opportunities for their people, and combating the climate crisis. The United States welcomed Egypt’s nomination by the African Union to host COP27 in Sharm el Sheikh and provide leadership as the incoming COP27 presidency in advancing global climate ambitions. The United States commended Egypt on its progress in developing green energy and intentions to pursue ambitious climate targets. The United States and Egypt announced the launch of a high-level Joint Economic Commission, formation of a joint U.S.-Egypt Climate Working Group, plans for a green economy trade mission, and a new USAID trade reform program. Both sides also expressed intention to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between EXIM and the Egyptian Ministry of Finance.

The United States and Egypt reaffirmed their commitment to bilateral defense cooperation to meet current and future challenges, including in the field of counterterrorism and border and maritime security. Building upon the successful completion of the 32nd U.S.-Egypt Military Cooperation Committee, and the multinational exercise Bright Star 2021, Egypt reaffirmed its commitment to active participation in the Combined Maritime Forces. The United States noted the significance of Egypt’s recent $1 billion nationally funded contract to refurbish Egyptian Apache helicopters, supporting hundreds of U.S. jobs and increasing Egyptian readiness.  The United States and Egypt committed to discussing best practices in reducing civilian harm in military operations.  Both sides also noted the recent State Partnership Program between Egypt and the Texas National Guard as an opportunity to increase cooperation.  Both sides also noted the signature of the Acquisition and Cross Service MOU, which gives flexibility to bilateral logistic support.

The two countries reaffirmed their commitment to enhancing diplomatic and consular cooperation.

Egypt and the United States announced their intention to strengthen judicial and law-enforcement cooperation to combat transnational crime by sharing, as appropriate and consistent with international legal standards, evidence and information used to investigate and prosecute these crimes.  The United States and Egypt signed an MOU intended to facilitate and promote expeditious cooperation under their Treaty on Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters, which entered into force on November 29, 2001.  The United States and Egypt agreed to continue to strengthen educational and cultural cooperation. In that connection, participants discussed the expansion of people-to-people ties across educational, cultural, scientific and environmental exchanges and collaboration on programs such as the Fulbright, International Visitor Leadership, and U.S. Speakers programs. In addition, both sides emphasized the importance of cultural heritage protection and preservation through the framework of the U.S.-Egypt Cultural Property Agreement. The two delegations reaffirmed their commitment to scientific cooperation through the U.S.-Egypt Science and Technology Joint Fund, which was strengthened by the recent renewal of the U.S.-Egypt Science and Technology Agreement. The United States and Egypt expressed commitment to sign an extension of their MOU that strengthens Cultural Property Protection and to launch discussions for an action plan.

End text.

More from: Office of the Spokesperson
More from Area Control Network
1. Global Warming Network
2. Christians Online
3. Put your website in the archives
4. Area Control Network News

News Network

  • Attorney General Merrick Garland Addresses the 115,000 Employees of the Department of Justice on His First Day
    In Crime News
    Former Acting U.S. Attorney General Monty Wilkinson’s Remarks Good morning. It's my honor to welcome Merrick Garland back to the Department of Justice as the 86th Attorney General of the United States. I'd also like to recognize the Attorney General's wife Lynn, his brother-in-law Mitchell and his nieces Laura and Andrea. In many respects, this is a welcome home ceremony for the Attorney General. Before his appointment to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, he served with distinction in a number of positions here at Main Justice and as an Assistant U. S. Attorney in the District of Columbia.
    [Read More…]
  • Firearm Injuries: Health Care Service Needs and Costs
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found There is no complete information on the health care costs of firearm injuries. National data allow for estimates of the costs of initial hospital treatment and some first-year costs, but less is known about costs the more time passes from the injury. Examining available data and information, GAO found the following: Initial hospital costs: Using hospital data from 2016 and 2017—the most recent that were available—GAO estimated that the initial hospital costs of firearm injuries were just over $1 billion annually. However, physician costs not captured in the data could add around 20 percent to that total. GAO also found that each year there were about 30,000 inpatient stays and about 50,000 emergency department visits to initially treat firearm injuries, and that patients with Medicaid and other public coverage accounted for over 60 percent of the costs of this care. First-year costs: Findings from studies on health care costs within the first year of hospital discharge after a firearm injury suggest that those costs can be significant. For example, studies estimating first-year hospital readmissions costs found that up to 16 percent of firearm injury survivors with an initial inpatient stay were readmitted at least once for their injury, with average costs of $8,000 to $11,000 per patient. Long-term costs: Less is known about the costs of health care for firearm injuries beyond the first year after hospital discharge. GAO identified studies that estimated lifetime costs of these injuries, but the estimates relied on data from over 20 years ago, making them no longer a reliable indicator of costs. Clinical experts GAO met with described a wide range in both physical and behavioral health care needs for firearm injury survivors after hospital discharge, with some survivors needing lifelong care. These experts also told GAO that survivors often face barriers to receiving needed care, such as being denied care when it is not covered by their insurance. While not receiving needed services may minimize costs initially, the consequences of unmet health needs for firearm injury survivors may ultimately result in greater costs. Range of Physical Health Care Needs for Firearm Injuries after Hospital Discharge Why GAO Did This Study In 2019, close to 40,000 people died from a firearm injury in the U.S., and around twice that number sustained non-fatal injuries. Over 100 organizations representing health care providers consider the number of firearm injuries that occur each day to be a public health epidemic. Health care costs associated with firearm injuries—both those for services provided during initial hospital treatment and those for services provided long-term—are paid for, at least in part, by public payers, such as Medicaid and Medicare. GAO was asked to review the health care costs of firearm injuries. This report describes the initial hospital costs of firearm injuries in the U.S. and what is known about the costs of subsequent care, as well as the post-discharge services that may be needed to treat these injuries. GAO analyzed hospital data for 2016 and 2017 collected by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality related to the initial costs of treating firearm injuries, and conducted a literature review on the health care costs of these injuries following discharge. In addition, GAO moderated meetings with 12 experts, representing clinicians, economists, and others—selected with assistance from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine—to discuss the post-discharge health care service needs and costs of firearm injuries. The Department of Health and Human Services provided technical comments on a draft of this report, which GAO incorporated as appropriate. For more information, contact Carolyn L. Yocom at (202) 512-7114 or yocomc@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Blinken’s Call with Kuwaiti Foreign Minister Al-Sabah
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken Opening Remarks at the Annual Meeting of the President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (PITF)
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Announces Results in Fight Against the Opioid Crisis Two Years after Launch of Operation S.O.S.
    In Crime News
    In July 2018, the Department of Justice announced the launch of Operation Synthetic Opioid Surge (S.O.S), a program aimed at reducing the supply of synthetic opioids in 10 high impact areas and identifying wholesale distribution networks and international and domestic suppliers.
    [Read More…]
  • Internet of Things: Information on Use by Federal Agencies
    In U.S GAO News
    Many federal agencies (56 of 90) responding to GAO's survey reported using Internet of Things (IoT) technologies. Most often, agencies reported using IoT to: (1) control or monitor equipment or systems (42 of 56); (2) control access to devices or facilities (39 of 56); or (3) track physical assets (28 of 56) such as fleet vehicles or agency property. Agencies also reported using IoT devices to perform tasks such as monitoring water quality, watching the nation's borders, and controlling ships in waterway locks. Furthermore, IoT use by federal agencies may increase in the future, as many agencies reported planning to begin or expand the use of IoT. However, 13 agencies not using IoT technologies reported they did not plan to use the technologies for a range of reasons, including insufficient return on investment. Example of Government's Use of Internet of Things Technology: Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Monitoring Buoy Surveyed agencies most frequently reported increasing data collection (45 of 74), and increasing operational efficiency (43 of 74) as benefits of using IoT technologies. Increasing data collection can aid decision-making and support technology development; increased efficiencies may allow agencies to accomplish more with existing resources. According to EPA officials, sensors are able to transmit data eliminating the need for employees to visit sites to collect data. The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation reported that IoT technologies helped improve transit times through its locks. Agencies most frequently reported cybersecurity issues (43 of 74) and interoperability (30 of 74) as the most significant challenges to adopting IoT technologies. For example, the Transportation Security Administration's officials told us they could not ensure the security and privacy of passenger information and subsequently took its network-connected security equipment offline until they developed a solution. Most agencies' officials responding to GAO's survey (54 of 72), as well as officials interviewed as part of the case studies, reported using information technology (IT) policies developed by their agency, versus internal IoT-specific policies, to manage IoT technologies. Some agencies reported their IT policies were sufficient for the current challenges and risks associated with adopting IoT technologies, including cybersecurity. The Office of Management and Budget's officials stated they do not typically make policies for specific IT components but if needed would work with the National Institute of Standards and Technology and others to develop such policies. IoT generally refers to devices—from sensors in vehicles to building thermostats— that collect information, communicate it to a network, and may complete a task based on that information. Although IoT technologies may present an opportunity for the federal government to operate more efficiently and effectively, federal agencies may also face challenges in acquiring and using IoT. GAO was asked to review the federal government's experience with IoT. This report describes (1) IoT technologies selected federal agencies are using, (2) the benefits and challenges of using IoT technologies, and (3) policies and guidance selected agencies follow in using and acquiring IoT technologies. GAO surveyed 115 Chief Information Officers (CIO) and senior IT officials at federal agencies and subcomponents based on, in part, agency membership in the federal CIO Council; 90 responded. However, not all agencies replied to each question. GAO also selected the Department of Commerce, the Department of Homeland Security, EPA, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as case studies. GAO selected these agencies based on, among other things, their fiscal year 2020 IT budgets and examples of IoT use from literature. For each case study, GAO reviewed documents and interviewed officials from the Office of the CIO from the agency and officials from selected sub-components that use the IoT technologies. For more information, contact Andrew Von Ah at (202) 512-2834 or vonaha@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Awards Nearly $101 Million to Combat Human Trafficking
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice today announced it has awarded nearly $101 million, through the department’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP) in funding to combat human trafficking and provide vital services to trafficking victims throughout the United States.
    [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Calls on San Francisco Mayor to End “One Congregant” Rule for Places of Worship to Comply with the Constitution
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department today sent a letter to the San Francisco mayor explaining that the city’s policy of only allowing a single worshiper in places of worship regardless of their size, while allowing multiple patrons in other indoor settings including gyms, tattoo parlors, hair salons, massage studios, and daycares, is contrary to the Constitution and the nation’s best tradition of religious freedom.
    [Read More…]
  • Bulgaria Travel Advisory
    In Travel
    Reconsider travel to [Read More…]
  • Local woman guilty of disaster fraud
    In Justice News
    A 46-year-old Houston [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken to Embassy Copenhagen Staff
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Government Intervenes in False Claims Act Lawsuits Against Kaiser Permanente Affiliates for Submitting Inaccurate Diagnosis Codes to the Medicare Advantage Program
    In Crime News
    The United States has intervened in six complaints alleging that members of the Kaiser Permanente consortium violated the False Claims Act by submitting inaccurate diagnosis codes for its Medicare Advantage Plan enrollees in order to receive higher reimbursements.
    [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Settles with Newark Public Schools to Protect English Learner Students
    In Crime News
    Today the Justice Department announced a settlement agreement with Newark Public Schools to resolve the department’s investigation into the school district’s programs for its English learner students. The agreement ends the district’s longstanding and common practice of removing students from English learner programs before they become fluent in English. The district has agreed to improve services for English learner students so they can access the same educational opportunities as other students in the Newark Public Schools.
    [Read More…]
  • United States Welcomes Actions by Armenia and Azerbaijan
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Hawaii Couple Indicted in Tax Fraud Scheme
    In Crime News
    A federal grand jury in Honolulu, Hawaii, returned an indictment on May 13 charging a Hawaii husband and wife with conspiring to defraud the United States and filing a false tax return. The husband was also charged with five counts of money laundering.
    [Read More…]
  • Facing Long Post-Hurricane Recovery, Court in La. Gets Help From Friends
    In U.S Courts
    Hurricane Laura has left a lasting impact on the Western Louisiana community of Lake Charles, and the federal courthouse could be closed a year or more. Despite the disarray, courts in New Orleans, Texas, and even Alaska have reached out to support the court’s staff in getting back on their feet.  
    [Read More…]
  • Human Capital: Actions Needed to Better Track and Provide Timely and Accurate Compensation and Medical Benefits to Deployed Federal Civilians
    In U.S GAO News
    The Department of Defense (DOD) and other executive agencies increasingly deploy civilians in support of contingency operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Prior GAO reports show that the use of deployed civilians has raised questions about the potential for differences in policies on compensation and medical benefits. GAO was asked to compare agency policies and to identify any issues in policy or implementation regarding (1) compensation, (2) medical benefits, and (3) identification and tracking of deployed civilians. GAO reviewed laws and agency policies; interviewed officials responsible for governmentwide guidance at the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and for policy at six selected agencies, including DOD and State; reviewed all workers' compensation claims filed by deployed civilians from January 1, 2006 through April 30, 2008 at the Department of Labor; and conducted a generalizeable survey of civilians deployed from the six agencies during this same period.Although policies concerning compensation for deployed civilians are generally comparable across agencies, GAO found some issues that affect the amount of compensation--depending on such things as the agency's pay system or the employee's grade/band--and the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of this compensation. For example, two civilian supervisors with comparable salaries who deploy under different pay systems receive different overtime pay because the overtime rate is determined by the employee's pay system and grade/band level. While a congressional subcommittee asked OPM to develop a benefits package for all deployed civilians to war zones and to recommend enabling legislation, OPM has not yet developed such a package or provided legislation. Also, implementation of some policies may not always be accurate or timely. For example, GAO estimates that approximately 40 percent of the deployed civilians in its survey reported experiencing problems with compensation--including not receiving danger pay--in part because they did not know where to go for assistance. Moreover, in January 2008, Congress gave agency heads discretion to apply the death gratuity provision retroactively for deaths connected with operations in Iraq or Afghanistan on or after October 7, 2001. At the time of GAO's review, agencies had not yet issued formal policy to implement this benefit. Although agency policies on medical benefits are similar, GAO found some issues with medical care following deployment, workers' compensation, and post deployment medical screenings that affect the benefits of deployed civilians. Specifically, while DOD allows its treatment facilities to care for "non-DOD" civilians following deployment in some cases, the circumstances are not clearly identified in guidance and some agencies were unaware of DOD's policy. Civilians who deploy also may be eligible for medical benefits through worker's compensation. GAO's analysis of 188 such claims filed with Labor revealed some significant processing delays resulting in part from lack of clarity about the documentation required to support claims. Without clear information on what documents to submit to support a claim, applicants may continue to experience delays. Further, while DOD requires medical screening before and following deployment for civilians, State requires medical screenings only before deployment. Prior GAO work found that documenting the medical condition of deployed personnel before and following deployment was critical to identifying conditions that may have resulted from deployment. Each agency provided GAO with a list of deployed civilians, but none had fully implemented policies to identify and track these civilians. DOD, for example, had procedures to identify and track deployed civilians but concluded that its guidance was not consistently implemented. While the other agencies had some ability to identify and track civilians, some had to manually search their systems. Thus, agencies may lack critical information on the location and movement of personnel, which may hamper their ability to intervene promptly to address emerging health issues, as GAO has previously reported.
    [Read More…]
  • U.S.-Greenland Technical Engagement on Mining Sector Education and Training
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Firestone Polymers Agrees to Settle Multiple Environmental Claims at its Louisiana Rubber Manufacturing Plant
    In Crime News
    Firestone Polymers LLC (Firestone) has agreed to resolve alleged violations of the Clean Air Act and several other federal and state environmental laws at the company’s synthetic rubber manufacturing facility in Sulfur, Louisiana. The company will also pay a total of $3.35 million in civil penalties.
    [Read More…]
  • Turkey National Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]

Crime

Network News © 2005 Area.Control.Network™ All rights reserved.