January 25, 2022

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Joint Statement on Reports of Summary Killings and Enforced Disappearances in Afghanistan

15 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The text of the following statement was released initially by the Governments of the United States of America, Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Denmark, the European Union, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and Ukraine.

Begin Text:

We are deeply concerned by reports of summary killings and enforced disappearances of former members of the Afghan security forces as documented by Human Rights Watch and others.

We underline that the alleged actions constitute serious human rights abuses and contradict the Taliban’s announced amnesty.  We call on the Taliban to effectively enforce the amnesty for former members of the Afghan security forces and former Government officials to ensure that it is upheld across the country and throughout their ranks.

Reported cases must be investigated promptly and in a transparent manner, those responsible must be held accountable, and these steps must be clearly publicized as an immediate deterrent to further killings and disappearances.

We will continue to measure the Taliban by their actions.

End text.

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