January 27, 2022

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Italy Travel Advisory

13 min read

Reconsider travel to Italy due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution due to terrorism

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Italy due to COVID-19.

Improved conditions have been reported within Italy. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Italy.

Italy has a longstanding risk presented by terrorist groups, who continue plotting possible attacks in Italy. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Italy:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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