December 4, 2021

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Intersex Awareness Day

18 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

On October 26, we proudly recognize the voices and human rights of intersex people around the world.  The Department of State is committed to promoting and protecting the rights, dignity, and equality of all individuals, including intersex persons.  It is the policy of the United States to pursue an end to violence and discrimination on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and sex characteristics, while acknowledging the intersections with disability, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin, or other status.

Intersex persons are subject to violence, discrimination, and abuse on the basis of their sex characteristics.  Many intersex persons, including children, experience invasive, unnecessary, and sometimes irreversible medical procedures.  The Department supports the empowerment of movements and organizations advancing the human rights of intersex persons and the inclusion of intersex persons in the development of policies that impact their enjoyment of human rights.

We stand with the activists, intersex human rights organizations, and others in civil society who tirelessly work to advance the human rights of intersex persons with governments, international institutions and organizations, and communities around the world.

 

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