December 4, 2021

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International Religious Freedom Day

16 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

We join the international community in marking the occasion of International Religious Freedom Day.  Freedom of religion or belief has been central to the American experience since our nation’s inception.  A cherished American value and universal human right, our own experience compels us to advocate for the rights of vulnerable and underrepresented people around the world.  The United States maintains its unwavering support to promote and protect freedom of religion or belief for all.

We remain committed to working with civil society and governments, including the 33 members of the International Religious Freedom of Belief Alliance, to confront global challenges, including blasphemy and apostasy laws or other efforts to criminalize forms of speech and expression, discriminatory laws and abuses by authorities, or excessive and onerous government regulation of religion and religious life.  Whether by shining a spotlight on the worst offenders and abuses of religious freedom or seeking justice for victims and accountability for perpetrators of abuses or violations of religious freedom, we must work to advance international religious freedom together.

Today, and every day, we stand for the rights of all individuals to exercise their freedom of religion or belief in accordance with the dictates of their conscience.

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