January 27, 2022

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Imperial Pacific International and MCC International Saipan Executives Indicted on Federal Charges

12 min read
<div>Three executives from Imperial Pacific International (IPI) and MCC International Saipan have been indicted on federal criminal charges, including Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) conspiracy, harboring illegal aliens, unlawful employment of aliens, and international promotional money laundering announced Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney Shawn N. Anderson for the Districts of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.</div>

Three executives from Imperial Pacific International (IPI) and MCC International Saipan have been indicted on federal criminal charges, including Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) conspiracy, harboring illegal aliens, unlawful employment of aliens, and international promotional money laundering announced Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney Shawn N. Anderson for the Districts of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

On Aug. 1, 2019, a federal grand jury returned a 71-count superseding indictment against Liwen Wu, aka Peter Wu, Jianmin Xu, and Yan Shi.  The charges were unsealed today.  The indictment alleges that these individuals committed criminal acts while holding executive positions with IPI and MCC International Saipan.  The defendants are accused of utilizing criminal labor practices during ongoing construction of the Grand Mariana Casino Hotel and Resort on the island of Saipan.  The defendants are further alleged to have transferred over $24 million into the United States to promote their illegal activity.

All three defendants are foreign nationals who currently reside outside of the United States.  Upon returning to the United States, the individuals will be arrested, arraigned, and brought to trial in federal court.

The case is being investigated by the FBI, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations, IRS Criminal Investigation, and the U.S. Department of Labor – Wage & Hour Division.  Leshia Lee-Dixon of the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Eric O’Malley are prosecuting the case.

An indictment merely alleges that crimes have been committed.  All defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Anyone with further information regarding this matter is urged to call the FBI’s Saipan Office at 670-322-6934.

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice.  Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

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