January 25, 2022

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Iceland Travel Advisory

12 min read

Reconsider travel to Iceland due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.     

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Iceland due to COVID-19.    

Iceland has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Iceland.

Read the country information page.  

If you decide to travel to Iceland: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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