January 27, 2022

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Hungary Travel Advisory

11 min read

Reconsider travel to Hungary due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Hungary due to COVID-19.

Improved conditions have been reported within Hungary. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Hungary.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Hungary:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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