January 25, 2022

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Honduras Travel Advisory

21 min read

Do not travel to Honduras due to COVID-19. Reconsider travel to Honduras due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Honduras due to COVID-19.      

Travelers to Honduras may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within Honduras due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Honduras.

Do not travel to:

  • Gracias a Dios Department due to crime.

Violent crime, such as homicide and armed robbery, is common. Violent gang activity, such as extortion, violent street crime, rape, and narcotics and human trafficking, is widespread. Local police and emergency services lack sufficient resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Honduras:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Avoid demonstrations
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Avoid walking or driving at night.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Exercise caution using cell phones in public, including inside of cars while stopped in traffic.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Honduras.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Gracias a Dios Department

Gracias a Dios is an isolated area with high levels of criminal activity and drug trafficking. Infrastructure is weak, government services are limited, and police and military presence is scarce.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Gracias a Dios as U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to the area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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