January 29, 2022

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High Ranking MS-13 Gang Member Facing Federal Firearms Charges After Nightclub Shooting

21 min read
<div>A criminal complaint was unsealed Nov. 6 charging the local leader of an MS-13 Gang clique with being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm, announced Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney Don Cochran for the Middle District of Tennessee.</div>

A criminal complaint was unsealed Nov. 6 charging the local leader of an MS-13 Gang clique with being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm, announced Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney Don Cochran for the Middle District of Tennessee.

Sergio Alvarado, aka Sergio Ochoa, 27, of Nashville, Tennessee, was initially arrested on Oct. 31 by Metropolitan Nashville Police Department (MNPD) officers after fleeing from officers following a shootout at Club Miami.  This incident began around 4:00 a.m. when a MNPD officer heard gunfire coming from the vicinity of the nightclub.  The officer proceeded toward the nightclub and upon arrival, heard a volley of gunshots and saw two cars speeding out of the parking lot.  The officer then found one individual in the parking lot suffering from a gunshot wound. 

Additional officers arrived on the scene and approached a car believed to be involved in the shooting.  As officers approached the car, they saw Alvarado running toward the back of the parking lot and toward several dumpsters.  Officers continued to pursue Alvarado and eventually found him in a wooded area and arrested him.  After tracing the flight path taken by Alvarado, officers recovered a 9mm pistol and a .380 caliber pistol near the dumpsters.  Alvarado was later released on bond.  On Nov. 5, Alvarado was arrested on the federal firearms charge.  

A detention motion filed Friday by the government asserts that Alvarado is the leader of the local MS-13 clique – Thompson Place Locos Salvatrucha.  This gang is a violent, international street gang that operates in middle Tennessee and elsewhere.  The motion also asserts that Alvarado has a substantial criminal history, including several drug trafficking and firearm offenses; is currently on supervised release from a 2017 case in which he received a 30-month sentence for drug trafficking and firearm offenses; and that he has further violated the terms of his release by associating with a known felon, Michael Mosely, at Dogwood Bar in Nashville, moments before Mosely stabbed two individuals to death on Dec. 21, 2019. 

This case is being investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives; U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations; and MNPD.  Trial Attorney Matthew Hoff of the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Ahmed Safeeullah are prosecuting the case. 

A criminal complaint is merely an accusation.  The defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.  

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice.  Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

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