December 5, 2021

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Guinea Travel Advisory

17 min read

Reconsider travel to Guinea due to COVID-19.  Exercise increased caution in Guinea due to civil unrest.  

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Guinea due to COVID-19.   

Guinea has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Guinea.

Country Summary: Demonstrations occur frequently throughout the country and are often sporadic and unplanned, making it difficult to predict the size, route, or level of violence or congestion that may occur.

Any demonstration may turn violent, resulting in injuries and even fatalities. Demonstrators may attack vehicles that attempt to pass through or around the protests, resulting in serious injuries and vehicular damage. Criminals are known to take advantage of the resulting traffic congestion to rob drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Uniformed security forces may also extort drivers and passengers during these incidents.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Guinea:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s webpage regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Guinea.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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