January 19, 2022

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Grenada Travel Advisory

9 min read

Exercise increased caution in Grenada due to health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions.  

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

Grenada has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within Grenada. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Grenada.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Grenada:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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