January 26, 2022

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Georgia Travel Advisory

15 min read

Reconsider travel to Georgia due to COVID-19. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Georgia due to COVID-19.

Improved conditions have been reported within Georgia. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Georgia.

Do Not Travel to:

  • The Russian-occupied regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia due to risk of crime, civil unrest, and landmines.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Georgia:

South Ossetia and Abkhazia – Do Not Travel

Russian troops and border guards occupy both South Ossetia and Abkhazia. The precise locations of administrative boundary lines are difficult to identify. Entering the occupied territories will likely result in your arrest, imprisonment, and/or a fine. Violent attacks and criminal incidents occur in the region. Landmines pose a danger to travelers near the boundary lines of both territories.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in South Ossetia and Abkhazia, as U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling there.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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