January 25, 2022

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Senate Gift Shop Revolving Fund: Procedures Related to FY 2020 Receipts and Disbursements

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<div>What GAO Found GAO performed agreed-upon procedures solely to assist the Secretary of the Senate in ascertaining whether the Senate Gift Shop Revolving Fund's (Fund) fiscal year 2020 receipts and disbursements were supported by information from the Senate Gift Shop and the Senate Disbursing Office. The procedures that GAO agreed to perform were related to the Senate Gift Shop's processes over (1) daily receipts, weekly deposits, and monthly reconciliations for the Fund's receipts and (2) purchasing, invoice payment, and monthly reconciliations for the Fund's disbursements. The Secretary of the Senate is responsible for the sufficiency of these agreed-upon procedures to meet its objectives, and GAO makes no representation in that respect. The report provides the details on the agreed-upon procedures and the results of performing each of the procedures. The Secretary of the Senate in an email response stated that she had no comments on the draft report. Why GAO Did This Study The Chairwoman and Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration requested that GAO perform procedures on the Fund's fiscal year 2020 receipts and disbursements. The Senate Gift Shop is under the authority of the Secretary of the Senate and is responsible for offering members, staff, and the general public the opportunity to purchase Senate memorabilia and gift items. All sales receipts are deposited into the Fund and then used to purchase inventory items for resale and supplies and to pay for shipping and other related service expenses. For more information, contact M. Hannah Padilla at (202) 512-5683 or padillah@gao.gov.</div>

What GAO Found

GAO performed agreed-upon procedures solely to assist the Secretary of the Senate in ascertaining whether the Senate Gift Shop Revolving Fund’s (Fund) fiscal year 2020 receipts and disbursements were supported by information from the Senate Gift Shop and the Senate Disbursing Office. The procedures that GAO agreed to perform were related to the Senate Gift Shop’s processes over (1) daily receipts, weekly deposits, and monthly reconciliations for the Fund’s receipts and (2) purchasing, invoice payment, and monthly reconciliations for the Fund’s disbursements.

The Secretary of the Senate is responsible for the sufficiency of these agreed-upon procedures to meet its objectives, and GAO makes no representation in that respect. The report provides the details on the agreed-upon procedures and the results of performing each of the procedures.

The Secretary of the Senate in an email response stated that she had no comments on the draft report.

Why GAO Did This Study

The Chairwoman and Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration requested that GAO perform procedures on the Fund’s fiscal year 2020 receipts and disbursements. The Senate Gift Shop is under the authority of the Secretary of the Senate and is responsible for offering members, staff, and the general public the opportunity to purchase Senate memorabilia and gift items. All sales receipts are deposited into the Fund and then used to purchase inventory items for resale and supplies and to pay for shipping and other related service expenses.

For more information, contact M. Hannah Padilla at (202) 512-5683 or padillah@gao.gov.

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