December 4, 2021

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Fulbright Program Partners with National Archives on New Heritage Science Fellowship

17 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The U.S. Department of State, the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, and the National Archives and Records Administration today formalized a new partnership to establish the first-ever Fulbright-National Archives Heritage Science Fellowship.

Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs Marie Royce, Chair of the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board Paul Winfree, and Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero signed a memorandum of understanding that will support archival science education, conservation, and research.  Heritage science is an interdisciplinary field that includes conservation, preservation, cultural heritage, archaeological science, and heritage management.

The new Fellowship will connect Fulbright visiting scholars with National Archives staff to conduct research at the National Archives’ state-of-the-art Preservation Lab.  Details about the first Fulbright-National Archives Heritage Science Fellowship for Fulbright visiting scholars, including eligibility and application details, will be announced soon.

The National Archives is the lead U.S. government agency responsible for archival science, research, preservation, and conservation.  This partnership with the Fulbright Program allows the National Archives to continue to advance and support collaborative research and academic engagement, and to help shape future leaders from around the world in these fields.

Established by the U.S. Congress in 1946, and celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, the Fulbright Program annually supports more than 8,000 students, scholars, artists, and professionals from the United States and more than 160 countries to study, teach, conduct research, exchange ideas, and find solutions to shared international challenges.

The National Archives is an independent federal agency that serves American democracy by safeguarding and preserving the records of our government, so people can discover, use, and learn from this documentary heritage.  Public access to government records strengthens democracy by allowing Americans to claim their rights of citizenship, hold their government accountable, and understand their history so they can participate more effectively in their government.  The National Archives carries out its mission through a nationwide network of archives, records centers, Presidential Libraries and online sources .

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) fosters mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries to promote friendly and peaceful relations and advance U.S. foreign policy goals.  The Bureau accomplishes this mission through academic, cultural, sports, and professional exchanges that engage youth, students, educators, artists, athletes, and rising leaders in the United States and more than 160 countries.  ECA administers the Fulbright Program, the U.S. government’s flagship international academic exchange program, and one of the most widely recognized and prestigious exchange programs in the world.

The Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, appointed by the President of the United States, is a 12-member board established by Congress to supervise the global Fulbright Program.  Representing diverse facets of American society, Board members select students, scholars, teachers, and others from the United States and abroad to participate in Fulbright exchanges, set policies, and guide the strategic vision of the Fulbright Program.

For more information, please visit eca.state.gov or contact ECA-Press@state.gov or National Archives Public Affairs at public.affairs@nara.gov.

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