January 20, 2022

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Former Employee At Los Alamos National Laboratory Sentenced To Probation For Making False Statements About Being Employed By China

9 min read
<div>Turab Lookman, 68, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, was sentenced on Sept. 11 to five years of probation and a $75,000 fine for providing a false statement to the Department of Energy.  Lookman is not allowed to leave New Mexico for the term of his probation.</div>

Turab Lookman, 68, of Santa Fe, New Mexico, was sentenced on Sept. 11 to five years of probation and a $75,000 fine for providing a false statement to the Department of Energy.  Lookman is not allowed to leave New Mexico for the term of his probation.

On June 6, 2018, Lookman, then an employee at Los Alamos National Laboratory, falsely denied to a counterintelligence officer that he had been recruited or applied for a job with the Thousand Talents Program, established by the Chinese government to recruit individuals with access to or knowledge of foreign technology and intellectual property.  Lookman pleaded guilty to the charge in January.

The FBI investigated this case. Assistant U.S. Attorneys George Kraehe and Jon Stanford prosecuted the case.

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