December 4, 2021

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Former Deputy Campaign Manager Pleads Guilty to Theft of Campaign Funds

10 min read
<div>An Illinois man pleaded guilty today to the theft of more than $115,000 in campaign funds from the McSally for Senate Campaign in 2018 and 2019.</div>
An Illinois man pleaded guilty today to the theft of more than $115,000 in campaign funds from the McSally for Senate Campaign in 2018 and 2019.

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