December 3, 2021

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Former Department of Defense Employee Charged with Assault Resulting in Serious Bodily Injury Brought to the United States to Face Charge

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<div>A former civilian employee of the Department of Defense arrived in the United States Friday from Germany to face a charge for assaulting a U.S. military member in the Republic of Korea last year.</div>
A former civilian employee of the Department of Defense arrived in the United States Friday from Germany to face a charge for assaulting a U.S. military member in the Republic of Korea last year.

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