January 24, 2022

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Fiji National Day

7 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States and the American people, I offer my congratulations to the people of Fiji as you mark fifty years of independence.

Much has changed in the world since 1970, but our friendship remains steadfast.  Fijians and Americans value the role that fundamental freedoms play in fostering happiness and prosperity for our two nations.  Together, we aspire to a more secure Indo-Pacific, and we are addressing the challenges of today to secure a promising future for our children.  We look forward to the next fifty years of close partnership with Fiji.

Please accept my best wishes as the people of Fiji celebrate this milestone.

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