December 4, 2021

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Fighting Between Armenia and Azerbaijan

26 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States is deeply concerned about reports of intensive fighting today between Armenia and Azerbaijan. We urge both sides to take immediate concrete steps to reduce tensions and avoid further escalation.  We also call on the sides to engage directly and constructively to resolve all outstanding issues, including border demarcation.

As noted in the Minsk Group Co-Chairs’ statement on November 15, the recent increase in tension between Armenia and Azerbaijan underscores the need for a negotiated, comprehensive, and sustainable settlement of all remaining issues related to or resulting from the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.

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