December 3, 2021

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Fifth Anniversary of Colombia’s Peace Accord

11 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the people and Government of the United States, I congratulate Colombia on the fifth anniversary of the signing of the Peace Accord.  Colombia’s 2016 Peace Accord ended five decades of conflict with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and represents the path to lasting peace.  The United States has a long history of supporting the Peace Accord, and we value its continuing implementation and achievements thus far.

Specifically, the demobilization and reintegration of 13,000 former combatants into communities across Colombia created opportunities for peaceful participation in Colombia’s political process.  The work to transform Colombia’s conflict-affected areas opened the door to a more economically vibrant, equal, and stable region. Colombia’s commitment to include 16 seats for conflict victims on the March 2022 congressional election ballot will fulfill another Peace Accord priority, giving victims a voice in Colombia’s democracy.  I commend the Special Jurisdiction for Peace for its efforts to bring justice and reparations to conflict victims as well as the Truth Commission for convening dialogue and reconciliation opportunities to overcome patterns and practices that drove the conflict.

Comprehensive implementation of the Peace Accord remains a generational opportunity to strengthen access to security, democratic institutions, and economic opportunities for all Colombians.  We commend Colombia’s efforts in implementing the Peace Accord and look forward to continuing our close cooperation to support lasting peace.

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