December 4, 2021

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Federal Court Enjoins Maryland Physician Assistant from Prescribing Opioids and Other Controlled Substances

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<div>A federal court in Maryland permanently enjoined a Baltimore-based physician assistant from prescribing opioids and other controlled substances, the Department of Justice announced today.</div>
A federal court in Maryland permanently enjoined a Baltimore-based physician assistant from prescribing opioids and other controlled substances, the Department of Justice announced today.

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