December 9, 2021

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Expansion of Combat Operation in Northern Ethiopia

10 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States is gravely concerned by the expansion of combat in northern Ethiopia.  We reiterate our call for the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) to withdraw from the Amhara and Afar regions, including halting its advances in and around the cities of Dessie and Kombolcha.  We urge the TPLF not to use artillery against cities and recall our strong objections to the ENDF airstrikes in Mekelle and other areas of Tigray which have cost countless lives.  There is no military solution to this conflict, and all parties must begin ceasefire negotiations without preconditions.

The United States remains committed to saving lives and alleviating suffering through the delivery of humanitarian assistance to all Ethiopians in need – whether in the Tigray, Amhara, or Afar region.  We continue to be alarmed by reports of the deliberate denial of humanitarian assistance in northern Ethiopia. Up to 900,000 people are living in famine-like conditions in Tigray while the government restricts urgently needed humanitarian supplies, including medicine, fuel, and cash for relief organizations.  We repeat our call on all parties to the conflict to allow and facilitate unhindered humanitarian access. 

We reiterate our call for all parties to protect civilians and end human rights abuses and violations of international humanitarian law.  Those responsible for such abuses and violations must be held accountable.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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