January 25, 2022

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Escalating Violence in Ethiopia’s Tigray Region

10 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States is deeply concerned by reports that the Tigray People’s Liberation Front carried out attacks on Ethiopian National Defense Force bases in Ethiopia’s Tigray region on November 3.  We are saddened by the tragic loss of life and urge immediate action to restore the peace and de-escalate tensions.  The protection of civilian safety and security is essential.  We will continue to follow this situation closely.  The United States stands with the people of Ethiopia and will work with all who are committed to peace, prosperity, democracy, and the rule of law.

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