January 20, 2022

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Eleventh Round of the Columbia River Treaty Negotiations

8 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The United States and Canada will hold the eleventh round of negotiations to modernize the Columbia River Treaty regime on December 9, 2021.  The United States and Canada began negotiations in May 2018.  The tenth round took place on June 29-30, 2020.  The United States’ key objectives include continued, careful management of flood risk; ensuring a reliable and economical power supply; and improving the ecosystem.  U.S. negotiators continue to use the U.S. Entity Regional Recommendation for the Future of the Columbia River Treaty after 2024 as a useful guide during the negotiations.

For further information, please visit:  https://www.state.gov/columbia-river-treaty/.

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