December 9, 2021

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Eastern North Pacific 5-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook

19 min read
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Tropical Weather Outlook
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
500 AM PDT Wed Nov 3 2021

For the eastern North Pacific...east of 140 degrees west longitude:

1. A low pressure system located over the far eastern Pacific more than 
100 miles southwest of Costa Rica is gradually becoming better 
defined. Shower and thunderstorm activity is also beginning to show 
signs of organization, and environmental conditions are expected to 
be conducive for the formation of a tropical depression during the 
next couple of days. The system is forecast to move slowly westward 
to west-northwestward away from the coast of Central America during 
the next several days. Regardless of development, this disturbance 
is expected to produce locally heavy rainfall across portions of 
Costa Rica through today, which could result in flooding and 
mudslides. 
* Formation chance through 48 hours...medium...50 percent.
* Formation chance through 5 days...high...70 percent.

2. An area of disturbed weather is located several hundred miles 
south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico.  Some slow development of this 
system is possible during the next several days while it moves 
westward to west-northwestward at 5 to 10 mph well to the south of 
the southern coast of Mexico.
* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...near 0 percent.
* Formation chance through 5 days...low...30 percent.

Forecaster Stewart

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