January 22, 2022

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Dominican Republic Travel Advisory

18 min read

Do not travel to the Dominican Republic due to health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions.  

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for the Dominican Republic due to COVID-19.   

Travelers to the Dominican Republic may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within the Dominican Republic due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the Dominican Republic.

Exercise increased caution in the Dominican Republic due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault is a concern throughout the Dominican Republic. The development of a professional tourist police corps, institution of a 911 system in many parts of the country, and a concentration of resources in resort areas means these tend to be better policed than urban areas like Santo Domingo. The wide availability of weapons, the use and trade of illicit drugs, and a weak criminal justice system contribute to the high level of criminality on the broader scale.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Dominican Republic:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Follow the advice of resort and tour operators regarding local safety and security concerns
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for the Dominican Republic.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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