January 22, 2022

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Designations of Four PRC and Hong Kong Officials Threatening the Peace, Security, and Autonomy of Hong Kong

11 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Hong Kong-based officials continue to dismantle the promised autonomy and freedoms of Hong Kong through politically motivated arrests. Today, the U.S. Department of State is designating four PRC and Hong Kong officials in connection with implementing the PRC-imposed National Security Law and threatening the peace, security, and autonomy of Hong Kong, pursuant to Executive Order 13936.

The Department of State is designating Li Jiangzhou, Edwina Lau, and Steve Li Kwai-Wah as having been leaders or officials of entities, including any government entity, that have engaged in, or whose members have engaged in, developing, adopting, or implementing the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Safeguarding National Security in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (NSL). Li Jiangzhou is the Deputy Director of the Office for Safeguarding National Security, which was established under the NSL. Edwina Lau is the head of the National Security Division of the Hong Kong Police Force and Steve Li Kwai-Wah is the Senior Superintendent.

Additionally, this action designates Deng Zhonghua, the Deputy Director of the Hong Kong & Macau Affairs Office (HKMAO). The HKMAO – one of the central government’s primary offices on Hong Kong policy – has taken several actions to interfere in Hong Kong affairs and crack down on protestors.

These individuals will be barred from travelling to the United States and their assets within the jurisdiction of the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons will be blocked. These actions underscore U.S. resolve to hold accountable key figures that are actively eviscerating the freedoms of the people of Hong Kong and undermining Hong Kong’s autonomy.

The United States calls on Beijing to abide by international commitments it made in the Sino – British Joint Declaration, a UN-registered treaty.

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