December 3, 2021

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Designation of Six Targets Involved in Iran’s Destabilizing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Activities

11 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States will use every appropriate tool to counter Iran’s malign influence and activities, including its proliferation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). The United States has designated six Iranian targets – two entities and four individuals – using Executive Orders that address terrorism and WMD proliferation.  These targets are linked to Iran’s UAV activities, including activities that threaten U.S. interests.

Iran-based Kimia Part Sivan Company, Mohammad Ebrahim Zargar Tehrani, and Brigadier General Saeed Aghajani are all being designated under E.O. 13224 for their links to Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) UAV activities.

Iran-based Mado Company, Yousef Aboutalebi, and Chief Brigadier Gen. 2 Abdollah Mehrabi are all being designated under E.O. 13382 for their links to the IRGC and its affiliate units.

The IRGC has used and proliferated lethal UAVs to Iranian-supported groups, including attacks on U.S forces and on international shipping.

The United States will use all available tools, including sanctions, to prevent, deter, and dismantle the procurement networks that supply UAV-related material and technology to Iran, as well as the Iranian entities that engage in such proliferation.

For more information about today’s designations, please see the Department of the Treasury’s press release.

 

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

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