January 19, 2022

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Designation of Jhon Fredy Zapata Garzon Under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

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Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The Department of State joins the Department of the Treasury in announcing the designation of Jhon Fredy Zapata Garzon pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act for materially assisting the international narcotics trafficking activities of the Clan del Golfo in Colombia.  Three of his family members and associates are also being designated along with four businesses they own or control.  Zapata Garzon has been assessed to be a major drug trafficker responsible for facilitating the shipment of cocaine on behalf of the Clan del Golfo.

This action is  part of a  continued  whole-of-government  effort to crack down on the illegal narcotics trafficking that affects the lives of hundreds of thousands of Americans.  The Department of the Treasury implements sanctions and coordinates with the Department of State on sanctions programs aimed at disrupting and dismantling narcotics trafficking and transnational organized crime networks.  To date, over 2,200 individuals have been designated under the Kingpin Act and more than 115 individuals have been designated pursuant to E.O. 13581.

For more information on the individuals listed above, please contact INL-PAPD@state.gov or see https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/Pages/default.aspx .

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