December 9, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Travel to Uruguay and Peru

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Office of the Spokesperson

In Montevideo from November 7-9, Deputy Secretary Sherman will meet with senior government officials to discuss continued efforts to advance democratic governance and human rights in the region; reinforce U.S.-Uruguay economic, security, and counternarcotics cooperation; discuss climate and environmental protection issues; and engage on other matters reflecting the important U.S.-Uruguay bilateral relationship.   The Deputy Secretary will also meet with renewable energy business leaders to advance clean energy cooperation.

Deputy Secretary Sherman will then travel to Lima from November 9-11.  The Deputy Secretary will meet with senior government officials to discuss shared priorities, including democratic governance; growing bilateral opportunities for inclusive trade and investment; promoting and protecting human rights; prioritizing orderly and humane migration processes; the COVID-19 pandemic; and addressing the climate crisis.  While in Lima, the Deputy Secretary will also meet with Indigenous community representatives and members of civil society.

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