December 9, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Uruguayan President Lacalle Pou

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman met with Uruguayan President Luis Lacalle Pou today in Montevideo, Uruguay.  Deputy Secretary Sherman and President Lacalle Pou discussed the importance of the strong U.S.-Uruguay bilateral relationship for promoting economic growth, regional security, and clean energy investment, among other areas.  Deputy Secretary Sherman expressed appreciation for Uruguay’s leadership on defending democracy and human rights in the region as well as Uruguay’s regional and global leadership on environmental protection and combating the climate crisis.

 

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