December 3, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with UNFPA Executive Director Kanem

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary Wendy R. Sherman met with United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Executive Director Dr. Natalia Kanem today in Washington. Deputy Secretary Sherman and Dr. Kanem discussed how empowering women and girls, including by promoting sexual and reproductive health and rights, advances human rights, gender equality, and global health. They also discussed the importance of preventing sexual assault and sexual violence. Deputy Secretary Sherman announced an inaugural U.S. contribution of $5 million to UNFPA Supplies, which will help ensure that modern contraceptives and lifesaving maternal health medicines reach women and adolescent girls who need access to family planning and safe delivery in countries affected by humanitarian emergencies.

 

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