January 25, 2022

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Republic of Korea First Vice Foreign Minister Choi

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman met with Republic of Korea (ROK) First Vice Foreign Minister Choi Jong Kun today in Washington.  Deputy Secretary Sherman and First Vice Foreign Minister Choi reaffirmed the U.S.-ROK Alliance as the linchpin of peace, security, and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific and beyond.  The Deputy Secretary welcomed the ROK’s regional and global leadership and stressed the U.S. commitment to working with allies and partners to defend the rules-based international order, as well as unwavering U.S. support for all those working toward the peaceful restoration of Burma’s path to democracy. The two also discussed the DPRK and our shared commitment to the complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. The Deputy Secretary and the First Vice Foreign Minister underscored U.S.-Japan-ROK cooperation is essential to tackling the global challenges of the 21st Century, including combating COVID-19 and the climate crisis and ensuring resilient supply chains and post-pandemic economic recovery.

 

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