December 4, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with President of the Peruvian Congress María del Carmen Alva

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman met with Peruvian Congress President María del Carmen Alva Prieto today in Lima, Peru.  Deputy Secretary Sherman and Congress President Alva reiterated the importance of the United States and Peru working together to achieve our shared goals for ending the COVID-19 pandemic, promoting national and regional security, addressing environmental issues, and combating the climate crisis.  Deputy Secretary Sherman also highlighted U.S. health and development assistance to Peru and thanked Congress President Alva for Peru’s role in addressing regional migration.

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