December 4, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Peruvian Foreign Minister Maúrtua

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman met with Peruvian Foreign Minister Óscar Maúrtua today in Lima, Peru.  Deputy Secretary Sherman and Foreign Minister Maúrtua discussed opportunities for progress under the Build Back Better World Initiative, how the United States and Peru can work together to address the climate crisis, and our two countries’ shared commitment to human rights and democracy.  They also exchanged diplomatic notes to officially implement the Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue Agreement between the United States and Peru.  Deputy Secretary Sherman thanked Foreign Minister Maúrtua for his active participation in the COVID-19 ministerial hosted by Secretary Blinken today and reaffirmed the United States’ commitment to working with Peru and other partners across the hemisphere to bring the COVID-19 pandemic to an end.  She also thanked Foreign Minister Maúrtua for welcoming more than one million Venezuelan migrants to Peru.

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