January 25, 2022

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Chief of Staff for the President of the European Commission Seibert 

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Today, Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman met with Bjoern Seibert, Chief of Staff for European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen in Brussels.  They discussed Russia’s continued and unprovoked military build-up on Ukraine’s borders. The Deputy Secretary briefed Seibert on the NATO-Russia Council meeting earlier today, and on her engagement at the Strategic Stability Dialogue. Agreeing that Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity are shared priorities, both affirmed that further Russian aggression will be met with swift, severe, and coordinated consequences.

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